Olympian Ross Millington’s Top 10 Tips for Running Your Best 10K

Olympian Ross Millington’s Top 10 Tips for Running Your Best 10K

Great Britain’s 2016 Olympian and Team New Balance athlete Ross Millington will be making his UAE Healthy Kidney 10K debut on Sunday, April 29 in Central Park. In advance of the race, the 28 year-old, who holds a 28:46 personal best for 10K on the roads, shares his top 10 tips for running your best 10K.

1. Build an endurance base: For the running novice, even a 10K can sound like a daunting task. That is why it’s important to focus on building up mileage before trying any of the hard stuff. Millington advises runners to worry about distance first, and time later.

2. Don’t forget to speed: 10Ks are the happy medium between more speed-oriented races, like a 5K, and endurance competitions, such as the marathon. So, while stamina is important, speed training is imperative in keeping up with a 10K’s swift pace.

3. Monitor your heart rate: Heart rate tells you if you are overworking yourself and it’s a breeze to keep track of it. Simply check your pulse at the end of a run, count the number of beats you feel in 10 seconds, multiply that number by six and you have your heart rate. If you can handle an 8K at a level heart rate, that means it’s time to move on to a longer distance. If your heart rate is not where it should be, that’s an indicator that more endurance work is needed.

 Millington running in the 2018 United Airlines NYC Half

Millington running in the 2018 United Airlines NYC Half

4. Train on the race course: There is no better place to train for a race than on the course itself. There, you can more easily track your progress and have a leg up on familiarity with race-day surroundings.

5. Enjoy the view: When you are running in a place you really enjoy, it makes the training a lot easier. If you are going to push your body to its limits, you might as well enjoy your surroundings.

6. Hills, hills, and more hills: You have your speed and your endurance, but how about your strength? Hill running is a great way to build up your core without lifting all those heavy weights. As a result, Millington often embarks on hilly terrains during his easy runs.

7. Eat light on race day: Running a long race on a full stomach can be tough. That’s why Millington keeps it to something small, like a bagel a couple of hours before race time.

8. Don’t overthink it: On race day, all the physical preparation is over and the only things that can go wrong are in your mind. Millington combats that by treating the race like any other training session. He keeps the same mindset and even does the same warm-ups he would do before a training run.

9. Recover, but do not stop: Once the race is over, stopping right away could lead to some really tough cramping. Be sure to get a 10 to 20 minute slow jog in just to work the kinks out after you cross the finish line.

10. Enjoy yourself: It’s not the end of the world if you do not finish in a certain time. Millington truly enjoys what he does and relishes every opportunity he has to race. If that approach got him to the Olympics in Rio, it surely can get you through your next 10K with New York Road Runners.

Watch Millington put his advice into action this Sunday, as he competes in a field of world-class professional athletes at the UAE Healthy Kidney 10K. Watch the race in person in Central Park, or stream the race live on USATF.TV beginning at 8:50 a.m. ET. USATF.TV +PLUS subscribers will be able to watch a replay of the race on demand.

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